isfailuretocommunicate

fascinasians:

maasuforchange:

18mr:

Can you feel the force of my side-eye, Wall Street Journal?

"Fueled with Rice" is lazy, lazy, lazy writing. If the only thing you can think of when writing about a person of Asian descent is  "rice" then you should examine your journalistic skills. Are you actually producing quality writing? If the article had been about a Ukrainian player, would you have written "fueled by pierogis"? If the player had been russian would you have written "fueled by vodka"?
Is the title more effective with a racial stereotype, or can it function without it? The answer is always yes; yes, you can produce good quality journalism without using racial stereotypes.

They didn’t even try.

fascinasians:

maasuforchange:

18mr:

Can you feel the force of my side-eye, Wall Street Journal?

"Fueled with Rice" is lazy, lazy, lazy writing. If the only thing you can think of when writing about a person of Asian descent is  "rice" then you should examine your journalistic skills. Are you actually producing quality writing? If the article had been about a Ukrainian player, would you have written "fueled by pierogis"? If the player had been russian would you have written "fueled by vodka"?

Is the title more effective with a racial stereotype, or can it function without it? The answer is always yes; yes, you can produce good quality journalism without using racial stereotypes.

They didn’t even try.


When you grow up as a girl, the world tells you the things that you are supposed to be: emotional, loving, beautiful, wanted. And then when you are those things, the world tells you they are inferior: illogical, weak, vain, empty. The world teaches you that the way you exist in it is disgusting — you watch boys cringe backward in your dorm room when you talk about your period, blue water pretending to be blood in a maxi pad commercial. It is little things, and it is constant. In a food court in a mall, after you go to the gynecologist for the first time, you and your friend talk about how much it hurts, and over her shoulder you watch two boys your age turn to look at you and wrinkle their noses: the reality of your life is impolite to talk about. The world says that you don’t have a right to the space you occupy, any place with men in it is not yours, you and your body exist only as far as what men want to do with it. At fifteen, you find fifteen-year-old boys you have never met somehow believe you should bend your body to their will. At almost thirty, you find fifteen-year-old boys you have never met still somehow believe you should bend your body to their will. They are children. They are children.

— Stevie Nicks  (via)

(Source: whisperingwordsofwisdom)


I finally realized that most people’s hatred of Skyler had little to do with me and a lot to do with their own perception of women and wives. Because Skyler didn’t conform to a comfortable ideal of the archetypical female, she had become a kind of Rorschach test for society, a measure of our attitudes toward gender. I can’t say that I have enjoyed being the center of the storm of Skyler hate. But in the end, I’m glad that this discussion has happened, that it has taken place in public and that it has illuminated some of the dark and murky corners that we often ignore or pretend aren’t still there in our everyday lives.

Anna Gunn in an op-ed piece for The New York Times (via ladyricotta)


lisforlife:

“Yellow Face” follows the misadventures of an Asian American playwright named DHH who leads the protest against the yellow face casting, only to mistakenly cast a Caucasian actor in an Asian role in his own play. The film is based on David Henry Hwang’s play of the same name for which he received his third Obie Award in Playwriting and made him a finalist for the Pulitzer Prize for Drama. Hwang is an acclaimed playwright whose works include “FOB”, “Golden Child”, “Aida”, “Chinglish” and “M. Butterfly” for which he won the Tony Award.

“Yellow Face” is directed by Jeff Liu, Literary Manager at East West Players, and features a cast with experience in film, TV, theater and YouTube including Ryun Yu, Christopher Gorham, Linda Park, Sab Shimono, Emily Kuroda, Ki Hong Lee and Justin James Hughes.

The YOMYOMF Network is based on the pop culture blog, You Offend Me You Offend My Family, founded by director JUSTIN LIN (BETTER LUCK TOMORROW, FAST & FURIOUS FRANCHISE). Other partners include top YouTube personalities RYAN HIGA, KEVJUMBA and CHESTER SEE. Check out the channel and subscribe at https://www.youtube.com/yomyomf


From the moment we arrived, I knew that my family had survived a great war to bring me to this country. I understood that the conditions in Thailand and the camps were hard for those who knew more than I did. But for me, the hardness in life began in America. We are so lucky to be in this country, the adults all said. Watching them struggle belied this fact. We are so fortunate to be young, new lives opening before us, they believed. And yet the life in school that opened before me made me feel old in a world that was struggling to be young. A silence grew inside of me because I couldn’t say that it was sometimes sad to be Hmong, even in America.

— Kao Kalia Yang, The Latehomecomer (via theangryminority)


I love it when ya call me big oppa.: GENTLE/MAN ---- Bao Phi →

rockstarchinaman:

For Trayvon Martin, Shaima Alawadi, John T. Williams, Luis Ramirez, Yoshi Hattori, Vincent Chin, and all the rest

My parent’s truth: everyone in this country

hates us.

They know nothing about us, but blame us for

the deaths of their soldiers, whom we fought alongside,

for rape that did and…

The last sentence of this piece is just…yes.